Reorganizing the GMU Oral History Program Collection

This post was written by Emily Curley, our Oral History Program Coordinator.

The George Mason University Oral History Program has conducted over 200 interviews since 1999. Because we’re always adding to the collection, it’s time to reorganize the physical collection and the finding aid.

Oral History Collection, #R0122, in our closed stacks.

What we’ve done so far:

We’ve reorganized the physical collection. This included moving CD’s of oral history interviews into new boxes and arranging the individual interviews by date, rather than alphabetically. The collection increased from nine to eleven boxes and range from the late 1970’s to 2017. These histories cover a wide variety of topics including the history of George Mason University and Northern Virginia.

Our Next Steps:

  • Comparing the finding aid to the physical collection
  • Revising long abstracts and creating missing abstracts
  • Creating a new finding aid
  • Creating workflow for periodic updates of the Oral History finding aid

We will compare the finding aid to the physical collection and fill in any missing interviews. The finding aid was last updated in 2013, so there are over 50 oral histories that need to be added. After we have confirmed that all of the interviews are updated, we will check the finding aid once again and revise some of the abstracts. Some abstracts have too much information while others have too little. Our aim is to be as consistent as possible.

A box with an oral history pulled out to show what information goes on the labels.

After confirming that the abstracts are correct, I will be working with the Archives and Manuscript Librarian, Liz Beckman, to create a new finding aid, which is expected to go on our website sometime this summer.

Finally, I will create a guide for the next oral historian (who will start in September) so that they can periodically add new interviews and keep the finding aid up to date.

Links

GMU Oral History Program

Youtube

Finding Aid

Other Oral History Holdings

OMEKA Site

To search the collections held at Special Collections Research Center, go to our website and browse the finding aids by subject or title. Appointments are not necessary to request and view collections. Additionally, requests can be made to listen to oral histories in our Reading Room. Copies can also be made for a fee, which are listed on our website. Some oral histories may need to be converted to disk before they are available to patrons. For questions about oral histories, contact Emily Curley. To schedule an appointment or to request copies of an oral history, contact our Research Services Coordinator, Rebecca Bramlett.

“So, Success Attend St. Patrick’s Fist, For He’s a Saint So Clever”

For St. Patrick’s Day, we are featuring some books about the Emerald Isle!

This book includes many beautiful illustrations throughout. Some titles include “The Enchanted Lake”, “The Haunted Cellar”, and “The Legend of Knockfierna”.

Croker, Thomas Crofton, Irish Fairy Legends , DA990 .C8 1898, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

This book on the Aran Islands tells the tale of a man who stayed on the island. The three islands are located off of the western coast of Ireland. The writers poetic nature makes this book a satisfying read, full of details that make you feel you are actually there.

Synge, J.M., The Aran Islands , PR5533 .A417 1911, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

This is a folio sized book of over 600 pages, all decorated with a beautiful border, and contains footnotes and an index. It is surely a must read for anyone interested in or studying Irish history.

Mitchel, John, The History of Ireland , Folio DA910 .M145 1808, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

This last book, though we have many others in our collections, contains songs and their history. The title of this blog was taken from the song titled, “St. Patrick” in the page below in. Some other songs include, “The Shamrock”, “Whisky”, and a multitude of local songs.

Croker, Thomas Crofton, Popular Songs of Ireland , PR8860 .C7 1886, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

To search the collections held at Special Collections Research Center, go to our website and browse the finding aids by subject or title. You may also e-mail us at speccoll@gmu.edu or call 703-993-2220 if you would like to schedule an appointment, request materials, or if you have questions. Appointments are not necessary to request and view collections.

 

New Collection-Prince William County Historic Newspapers

Special Collections Research Center received a new collection of historic local newspapers from the Prince William County Library in November 2016. We have been working to reorganize and address preservation needs of these papers for future use by our patrons. The papers in this collection date roughly from 1861 to 1992. They are currently organized by date and paper title which has been split up into six series. The series are:

  • The Manassas Journal
  • The Prince William News
  • The Manassas Messenger
  • The Journal Messenger
  • Potomac News
  • Miscellaneous
    • This contains article clippings and issues from other papers like the Alexandria Gazette, The Fauquier Democrat, The Richmond News Leader, and The Richmond Times-Dispatch

We began processing this collection in January and have just finished boxing the documents and created the Finding Aid in early February.

Processing Coordinator and Manuscript and Archives Librarian looking through new collections in the processing area of Special Collections Research Center.

Along the way, we found many interesting articles. One article that stood out to us came from The State:

“A Woman in Pants” from The State. Undated but between 1870’s to 1890’s.

And of course the advertisements are always entertaining, like these from The Manassas Messenger dated November 15, 1951:

“Magic skin bodies…”

 

So if you are doing research on local history, love newspapers, or just have some free time, stop by and check out the new Prince William County Historic Newspaper collection, #C0301! The finding aid is now up on our website and you can find it here by searching our collections alphabetically or by subject under Northern Virginia and Regional History. You may also e-mail us at speccoll@gmu.edu or call 703-993-2220 if you would like to schedule an appointment, request materials, or if you have questions. Appointments are not necessary to request and view collections.

Civil Rights in the James H. Laue Papers

James H. Laue was born in River Falls, Wisconsin, in 1937. In 1959, Laue was admitted to the Harvard graduate program in sociology where he studied race relations and the sociology of religion. During his graduate studies, Laue became involved in the Civil Rights movement, attending lunch counter sit-ins, church “kneel-ins,” and protests organized by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, giving him first-hand knowledge that he would go on to use in his 1966 doctoral dissertation, “Direct Action and Desegregation: Toward a Theory of the Rationalization of Protest.”

Civil Rights Notebook-Atlanta Sit-In, page 19. James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 53, Folder 02, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

Civil Rights Notebook-Atlanta Sit-In, page 19. James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 53, Folder 02, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Click image to enlarge.

 

In 1986, Laue came to George Mason University and became the first Lynch Professor of Conflict Resolution. Until his death in 1993, Laue participated in dozens of academic conferences, taught numerous classes and workshops on dispute resolution, published scores of academic papers, collaborated with Civil Rights activists and arms-control advocacy groups, delivered sermons at churches and speeches at graduate commencements, and remained active in the field of peacemaking and conflict resolution.

 

"Mission Statement". James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 5, Folder 02, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“Mission Statement”. James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 5, Folder 02, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Click image to enlarge.

 

Poster for GMU Event. James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 98, Folder 14, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

Poster for GMU Event. James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 98, Folder 14, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Click image to enlarge.

 

His papers contain manuscripts, workshop papers, notebooks, legal documents, photographs, audio cassettes, memorabilia and correspondence with influential figures like Coretta Scott King. These papers document Laue’s development as a sociology student and Civil Rights activist in the early 1960s through his career as a mediator and professor of urban sociology and conflict resolution into the early 1990s.

The James H. Laue papers can be searched by clicking on any of the links above. If you are interested in learning more about the School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University, click here.

To search the collections held at Special Collections Research Center, go to our website and browse the finding aids by subject or title. You may also e-mail us at speccoll@gmu.edu or call 703-993-2220 if you would like to schedule an appointment, request materials, or if you have questions. Appointments are not necessary to request and view collections.