Celebrate National Moth Week with SCRC

The late Kjell Sandved, born in Norway in 1922, was a noted nature photographer who took pictures of various insects, including moths, from all over the world. Sandved is best known for finding and photographing various shapes and patterns on butterflies and moths, including every letter of the English alphabet, smiling faces, red hearts, and animal shapes. A member of the staff of the Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History, Sandved published two encyclopedias: The World of Music and The World of Art, and co-authored nine other works, including: Butterfly Magic, Insect Magic, and Spiders in the Smithsonian. He passed away on December 20, 2015.

To celebrate National Moth Week (July 23, 2016 – July 31, 2016), we are featuring some photographs that were donated to Special Collections Research Center by Kjell Sandved. 

"Dog figure on silkworm moth," Box 4, Page 12, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“Dog figure on silkworm moth, Rhodesia” Box 4, Page 12, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Copyright held by Kjell Sandved.

"Speiredonia Sp. Moth 'Face',"Box 4, Page 12, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“Speiredonia Sp. Moth ‘Face’, Sabah”Box 4, Page 11, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Copyright held by Kjell Sandved.

"Problepsis, new sp. moth 'bug design',"Box 4, Page 12, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“Problepsis, new sp. moth ‘bug design’, Malaya”Box 4, Page 10, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Copyright held by Kjell Sandved.

"Plutodes discigera moth, Malaya" Box 4, Page 12, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“Plutodes discigera moth, Malaya” Box 4, Page 10, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Copyright held by Kjell Sandved.

"Eucereon confusum moth, Manaus, Amazon" Box 4, Page 9, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“Eucereon confusum moth, Manaus, Amazon” Box 4, Page 9, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Copyright held by Kjell Sandved.

"Cosmosoma metallescens moth, Manaus, Amazon" Box 4, Page 9, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“Cosmosoma metallescens moth, Manaus, Amazon” Box 4, Page 9, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Copyright held by Kjell Sandved.

"'Warning behavior' repellant fluid from glands, Tiger Moth, Peru" Box 4, Page 8, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“‘Warning behavior’ repellant fluid from glands, Tiger Moth, Peru” Box 4, Page 8, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Copyright held by Kjell Sandved.

"Azatrephes discalis, Tiger Moth, Manaus, Amazon" Box 4, Page 8, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“Azatrephes discalis, Tiger Moth, Manaus, Amazon” Box 4, Page 8, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Copyright held by Kjell Sandved.

"Oospila sp. moth, Manaus, Amazon" Box 4, Page 8, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“Oospila sp. moth, Manaus, Amazon” Box 4, Page 8, in the Kjell Sandved nature photograph collection #C0020, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Copyright held by Kjell Sandved.

For more information about Moth Week and how to celebrate, visit:

http://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/northamerica/national-moth-week.xml 

http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/national-moth-week

The collection:

The finding aid for Kjell Sandved includes biographical information and a content list for the materials we hold. Additionally it can be found by going to sca.gmu.edu and searching for Kjell Sandved. Anyone can make an appointment to look through the collection by contacting speccoll@gmu.edu. 

The Kjell Sandved estate retains copyright for these photographs.

Two New Exhibitions in SC&A Feature Items from Collection of Rare Books by Jan Morris and Oliver Atkins Photographs

Jan Morris, as photographed in 1974.

Jan Morris, as photographed in 1974. Photo is from her 1974 book, Conundrum.

SC&A has completed two new exhibits of materials from its holdings.  On exhibit displays a group of books by historian and travel writer, Jan Morris, while the other features photographs from photographer, Oliver Atkins. Both exhibitions run through December 2015.

“Excerpts from a Life Well Traveled: The University Libraries’ Jan Morris Collection”

George Mason University Libraries acquired a collection of rare Jan Morris first editions and pre-release review copies in 2010. The collection consists of 135 books and one rare signed poster from the 1940s.  Born James Morris in 1926 in Somerset England, Morris underwent gender re-assignment surgery in 1972. In her highly personal work Conundrum: From James to Jan – An Extraordinary Personal Narrative of Transsexualism, Morris describes her life and sexual reassignment. Morris began as a newspaper writer, working on the editorial staff of The Guardian from 1957 to 1962 and was the first journalist to report the conquest of Mount Everest.

Destinations (1980) is a collection of Jan Morris travel essays for Rolling Stone Magazine.

Destinations (1980) is a collection of Jan Morris travel essays for Rolling Stone magazine.

Morris also served in the military, was married, and has 5 children. One of her children is Twm Morris, the musician and poet. Her most famous work is arguably the Pax Britannica trilogy, a history of the British Empire. She is also widely acclaimed for her travel writing, which includes famous profiles of Oxford, Venice, Wales, Hong Kong, and New York City. The collection is the generous gift of Philip M. Teigen. Teigen also donated a substantial collection of rare John Richard Green volumes to the Libraries in 2008. Teigen’s interest in collecting Morris’ works stems from his development of the John Richard Green Collection. He wrote in a letter to the Libraries that he views Morris as Green’s “20th century intellectual heir.” This exhibit combines images with excerpts from select works.

Oliver Atkins in China, 1972. Olliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection, Box 34, Folder 2. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives.

Oliver Atkins in China, 1972. Olliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection, Box 34, Folder 2. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives.

“A Life in Focus: A Look Inside the Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection”

Oliver F. Atkins was a professional photographer from the 1930s until the late 1970s.  He worked for several news organizations, the American Red Cross, The Saturday Evening Post, and the White House. He covered the Second World War and Korea as well as the American political and cultural landscape during the 1950s and 1960s.  Some of his subjects include Harry S Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard M. Nixon, John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr., Winston Churchill, Gamel Nasser, Nikita Kruschev, Josip B. Tito, and Jawaharlal Nehru.

High School students from Ozark, Arkansas visit Chinatown in New York City, May 1950.  Oliver Atkins Photograph Collection Box 12, Folder 13. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives. Images taken for the Saturday Evening Post are © Saturday Evening Post.

High School students from Ozark, Arkansas visit Chinatown in New York City, May 1950. Oliver Atkins Photograph Collection Box 12, Folder 13. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives. Images taken for the Saturday Evening Post are © Saturday Evening Post.

In 1969, Atkins became the personal photographer of President Richard M. Nixon and chief White House photographer. Of his many images of Nixon, the series documenting the meeting of December 18, 1970 with Elvis Presley is the most famous and the most often requested. The collection, which contains over 60,000 images, is held in the University Libraries’ Special Collections & Archives department in Fenwick, C-204. This exhibition looks at various facets of Atkins’ life, career, and works. The collection, which contains over 60,000 images, is held in the University Libraries’ Special Collections & Archives department in Fenwick, C-204. This exhibition looks at various facets of Atkins’ life, career, and works.

The resignation of Richard Nixon

This is the final post in a series on Richard Nixon during the Watergate investigation. The first one can be found here, the second one can be found here, the third one is here, and the fourth one is here.

Although Nixon made transcripts of the Oval Office tapes available in April 1974, the special prosecutor, Leon Jaworski, insisted on access to the physical tapes. Nixon’s attorneys appealed a decision by a federal court that ordered the release of the tapes. Finally on July 24, 1974, the Supreme Court ruled that Nixon must turn over the tapes. The recordings revealed that he did play a significant role in the cover-up of the Watergate burglary, and his impeachment appeared to be imminent unless he resigned. On August 8, 1974, Nixon announced his resignation for the following day.

Nixon and Ford talking in the Oval Office before Nixon announced his resignation, effective at noon the following day (August 8, 1974). Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection, Box 48, Folder 1. George Mason University. Libraries. Special Collections & Archives. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives.

Nixon and Ford talking in the Oval Office before Nixon announced his resignation, effective at noon the following day (August 8, 1974). Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection, Box 48, Folder 1. George Mason University. Libraries. Special Collections & Archives. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives.

Following his final meal in the White House, Nixon addressed the White House staff in the East Room, and then he walked out to board a helicopter accompanied by his family and the Fords.

President Nixon's last meal in the White House: pineapple, cottage cheese and milk (August 9, 1974). Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection, Box 26, Folder 2. George Mason University. Libraries. Special Collections & Archives. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives.

President Nixon’s last meal in the White House: pineapple, cottage cheese and milk (August 9, 1974). Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection, Box 26, Folder 2. George Mason University. Libraries. Special Collections & Archives. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives.

The Fords and the Nixons walk across the White House lawn to the presidential helicopter Marine One  (August 9, 1974). Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection, Box 26, Folder 1. George Mason University. Libraries. Special Collections & Archives. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives.

The Fords and the Nixons walk across the White House lawn to the presidential helicopter Marine One (August 9, 1974). Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection, Box 26, Folder 1. George Mason University. Libraries. Special Collections & Archives. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives.

Nixon gives a final victory sign before he boards Marine One (August 9, 1974). Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection, Box 26, Folder 1. George Mason University. Libraries. Special Collections & Archives. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives.

Nixon gives a final victory sign before he boards Marine One (August 9, 1974). Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection, Box 26, Folder 1. George Mason University. Libraries. Special Collections & Archives. Copyright not held by George Mason University Libraries. Restricted to personal, non-commercial use only. For permission to publish, contact Special Collections and Archives.

Following Richard and Pat Nixon’s departure, the Fords returned to the White House East Room for the swearing-in of Gerald Ford as President of the United States. One month later, he pardoned Nixon. For more on Watergate, see this page on the Washington Post website.

Digitized negatives from the Broadside photograph collection now available!

Archives Assistant Ignacio Bracamonte reflects on the Broadside scanning project and picks an image to share from the recently digitized, and now available online, box 7.

I was very excited to start this new project that Special Collections & Archives offered last semester. It has been over six months since my co-worker Liz and I started with the digitization of Broadside’s collection of photographs. I personally believe that working here, has involved me into George Mason more than ever. I am exposed to hundreds of images every day, where I witness the university’s development, history, important events, and even everyday life photos that were taken by students like me; the members of Broadside, George Mason’s student newspaper.

While  working at Special Collections & Archives, I have familiarized myself with many of Mason’s personalities and it is very easy for me to recognize them throughout the images: the faculty and staff members, the students, and the members of different organizations. After a while, you get a sense of affection to these personages and you can’t wait to know what happens next.

R0135B07P014_01

Rubenstein, Michele J. Opening of North Campus Broadside Office 5. October 14, 1973. George Mason University Broadside photograph collection, Collection #R0135, Special Collections and Archives, George Mason University.

This is one of my favorite photographs, where Jay Caine, director of Broadside, is inaugurating the newspaper’s North Campus office. Next to his colleagues, Jay Caine is about to cut the ribbon and establish a new office for George Mason’s student newspaper. This is a very symbolic image because it represents the beginning of Broadside. Even though the photograph was taken on October 14th of 1973, the newspaper endures and remains apart of the student experience at George Mason today.

Ignacio is currently scanning negatives from the Broadside photograph collection. The first box (box 7 in the collection) of over 900 digitized images are now available online. For more on the history of the student newspaper at Mason see the student newspaper exhibit blog post or visit the exhibit on the second floor of Fenwick Library until late April 2014.