The “Desegregation” of George Mason University

An African American student at Winter Graduation, January 17, 1975

Today George Mason University enjoys the reputation for being one of the more ethnically and culturally-diverse universities in the nation. By most counts, the non-white student population at Mason is about 57%*. The university places a high priority on being accessible to those who aspire to a college education from Continue Reading

Stuck Out of Time

Photos, snapshots of a minute frame of time, often only a fraction of a second, provide a stark and seemingly frozen glance into the past. Special Collections Research Center’s (SCRC) exhibit through April, From Tintypes to .TIFFs displays a variety of these tiny glimpses into the past in a multitude Continue Reading

Happy 136th Birthday, Virginia Woolf!

Virginia Woolf is easily described as one of the greatest and most innovative writers of the English language. Woolf, born in England on January 25, 1882 was also a pioneer of feminist and experimental writing, being one of the first to ever write a novel in a stream-of-consciousness narrative voice. Continue Reading

Reprocessing the Robert Breen Papers – Part II

Hello all! Amanda here again to chat with you about the Robert Breen papers. As reprocessing continues, I thought I’d share with you some of my favorite records from this collection (my most favorites being the Gloria Swanson and Joan Crawford letters, which you can see here.) Because the majority Continue Reading

George Mason University Pioneer: Eugenie V. Mielczarek

This post was written by Mike Rynearson, Research Services Assistant. In this week’s blog, we took the time to spotlight one of our manuscript collections of a trailblazing woman at George Mason University and in the scientific community. After graduating from Catholic University in 1963 with her Ph.D. in Physics, Continue Reading