SCRC Open House

Special Collections Research Center will be having an open house on September 7, 2016, 10:00 AM – 8:00 PM and September 8, 2016, 10:00 AM – 7:00 PM. Faculty, staff, students, alumni, and members of the public are all invited to stop by and learn about our collections, how you can use our materials, and how to search finding aids. A number of our materials will be placed in our seminar room for individuals to view. There will also be light refreshments.

 

For questions, please contact speccoll@gmu.edu or visit our website, sca.gmu.edu.

 

“Some books are lies frae end to end, And some great lies were never penn’d”

August 21st is Poet’s Day and we are celebrating by calling attention to just a few of our poetry books. The quote in the title comes from “Death and Doctor Hornbook: A True Story” by Robert Burns, featured in The Poetical Works of Robert Burns shown below.

Burns, Robert, Poetical Works of Robert Burns , PR4300 1850 B6, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

Burns, Robert, The Poetical Works of Robert Burns, PR4300 1850 B6, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

 

Dickinson, Emily, Letters of Emily Dickinson , PS1541 .Z5 A3 1931, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

Dickinson, Emily, Letters of Emily Dickinson, PS1541 .Z5 A3 1931, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

 

Yeats, W. B., The Secret Rose , PR5904 .S3 1897b, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

Yeats, W. B., The Secret Rose, PR5904 .S3 1897b, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

 

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner , PR4479 .A1 1910b, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, PR4479 .A1 1910b, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

 

Chaucer, Jeffrey, The Works of Our Ancient, Learned, & Excellent English Poet, Jeffrey Chaucer , PR1850 1687, Special Collections Research Center.

Chaucer, Jeffrey, The Works of Our Ancient, Learned, & Excellent English Poet, Jeffrey Chaucer, PR1850 1687, Special Collections Research Center.

 

Johnson, Samuel, The Works of English Poets , v.29 of 75, PR1171 .J6, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

Johnson, Samuel, The Works of English Poets, v.29 of 75, PR1171 .J6, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

 

Miyamori, Asatar?, An Anthology of Japanese Poems , PL884 .M585 1938, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

Caption reads, “Cherries and pines in the foreground. From a larger picture presented to Fuhrer Adolf Hitler by the Department of Education.” Miyamori, Asataro, An Anthology of Japanese Poems, PL884 .M585 1938, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

 

Alighieri, Dante, Dante's Hell , PQ4315.21 .P43 1857, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

Alighieri, Dante, Dante’s Hell, PQ4315.21 .P43 1857, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

 

T?ayyib, ?Abd Alla?h, al-H?ama?sah al-sughra? , PJ7641 .T37 1964, Special Collections Research Center.

Tayyib, Abd Allah, al-Hamasah al-sughra, PJ7641 .T37 1964, Special Collections Research Center.

 

Scaligero, Giulio Cesare, Iulij Caesaris Scaligeri viri clarissimi poematum , PA8575 .S3 P37 1591, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

Scaligero, Giulio Cesare, Iulij Caesaris Scaligeri viri clarissimi poematum, PA8575 .S3 P37 1591, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

 

Ovid, Les Metamorphoses , PA6523 .M2 B35 1732b v.1, Special Collections Research Center.

Ovid, Les Metamorphoses, PA6523 .M2 B35 1732b v.1, Special Collections Research Center.

 

Juvenal, Mores Hominum , PA6447 .E5 S7 1660, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

Juvenal, Mores Hominum, PA6447 .E5 S7 1660, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

 

For more information:

Poet’s Day

To schedule an appointment to view collections, contact Special Collections Research Center. Walk-ins are also welcome.

E-mail: speccoll@gmu.edu

Phone: 703-993-2220

From Pearl Harbor to Nagasaki

Document from scrapbook 14 of the Arthur E. Scott Photography Collection #C0096, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

Document from scrapbook 14 of the Arthur E. Scott Photography Collection #C0096, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

On August 6, 1945, the United States of America dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city, Hiroshima. A few days later on August 9th, another bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. It has been estimated that the total casualties from both bombs was under 230,000 individuals.

 

Japan was fighting for control over land in the Pacific before World War II, leading Japanese naval and air forces to strike Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. This surprise attack left an estimated 3,500 American casualties, less than 100 of them civilians, and many sunken or damaged ships. There were significantly fewer Japanese casualties and the attack overall was a failure. For the next couple years, the United States of America began creating an atomic bomb to use during World War II since it was known that other countries were also experimenting with the creation of a nuclear weapon.

 

Document from scrapbook 14 of the Arthur E. Scott Photography Collection #C0096, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

Document from scrapbook 14 of the Arthur E. Scott Photography Collection #C0096, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

 

The attack on Pearl Harbor was the beginning of the war between Japan and the United States. The U.S. government officially declared war with Japan on December 8, 1941. Only days later did the United States add Germany and Italy in their declaration of war, entering into World War II. As the war waged on, the United States of America, wanting Japan to surrender and end the war, dropped two atomic bombs. Shortly after the bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan surrendered and the war was over.

 

Canning, John, 50 True Tales of Terror, PR1309 .H6 A13 1972, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

Canning, John, 50 True Tales of Terror, PR1309 .H6 A13 1972, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

 

“Hiroshima — Death and Rebirth” by C.E. Maine in 50 True Tales of Terror, is a story of a young man named Yoshio who experiences the devastation brought on by the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. The narrator describes the “blinding white flash” and “searing heat” that Yoshio will always remember. The rest of the tale follows Yoshio as he stumbles over rubble, finds his cousin badly injured, desperately searches for his family, and helps the local hospitals by finding medical supplies.

 

 

 

 

 

For more information:

Hiroshima Day

Hiroshima and Nagasaki Testimonies

Pearl Harbor Survivors

 

To search the collections held at Special Collections Research Center, go to our website and browse the finding aids by subject or title. You may also e-mail us at speccoll@gmu.edu or call 703-993-2220 to schedule an appointment or request materials.

A Tribute to Arena Stage Founder Zelda Fichandler

Zelda Fichandler and another woman standing in front of an audience in the Hippodrome, probably in 1950. Arena Stage records, #C0017, Box 633, Folder 1, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“The miracle of theater is that it ever happens at all.”
– Zelda Fichandler, in Laurence Maslon’s The Arena Adventure: The First 40 Years

Zelda Fichandler, a powerhouse of the performing arts, passed away Friday, July 29 at the age of 91.  Fichandler was a founder of the Arena Stage which remains, because of her vision, Washington, DC’s preeminent regional theater, a space of imagination and innovation.  Fichandler’s artistic achievements span the length of her storied career, from the founding of Arena in 1950, to pushing for diversity on the stage with her thesis entitled “Towards a Deepening Aesthetic”, to educating future performers at NYU.  Zelda, supported by her husband Thomas Fichandler, gave opportunities to actors, performers, and visionaries who were willing to push the boundaries of theater, who were “trailblazers”, and who were unafraid of to challenge prevailing notions of race, identity, and class.

With her support, programs such as the Living Stage (an Arena venture) brought the theater to less privileged members of society and encouraged them to find deeper meaning in their lives through art.  Fichandler herself broke traditional ideas of gender roles as not only a founder of the largest regional theater on the East Coast, but also as its first Artistic Director, and a director of dozens of productions.  Zelda proved that theater is not the sole property of Broadway, or the ultra-wealthy, but instead belongs to us all.

Please visit our small photo tribute to Zelda at:

http://sca.gmu.edu/zelda.php

This post was written by SCRC Archives Assistant Nick Welsh.