Marriott, a Restauranteur Before a Hotel Magnate

J. Willard Mariott in front of a Hot Shoppes in 1948

J. Willard Mariott in front of a Hot Shoppes in 1948. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS


Nearly everyone over the age of 40 who grew up in the Washington, D.C. area must recall either eating at or driving by a Hot Shoppes restaurant. The brainchild of J. Willard Marriott, Hot Shoppes featured family-style comfort food, such as burgers, meatloaf, steaks, soups, fries, milkshakes, and numerous desserts.

Interior of a Hot Shoppes restaurant, Arlington, Virginia, 1948

Interior of a Hot Shoppes restaurant, 1948. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS

Exterior view of same restaurant

Exterior view of a Hot Shoppes restaurant in Rosslyn, Virginia, 1948. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS

Before becoming a hotel baron, J. Willard Marriott was a restauranteur. In 1927 he, his wife Alice, and a friend opened the first Hot Shoppe, a small A&W Root Beer stand in Washington, D.C.  Later Hot Shoppes restaurants were sit-down full-service family eateries, complete with a drive-in lane for curbside meals. During the chain’s heyday in the early 1960s there were more than 70 Hot Shoppes restaurants and cafeterias up and down the East Coast from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Greensboro, North Carolina. Hot Shoppes also provided food service to airlines, hospitals, apartment buildings, and highway rest areas in this region.

Marriott began its exit from the restaurant business in the late 1980s, as it slowly began liquidating its Hot Shoppes brand. The last Hot Shoppes restaurants finally closed down in the weeks before the Millennium.

Oliver Atkins of Fairfax, Virginia was Washington Photography Correspondent for the Saturday Evening Post during the years 1946-1968. These photos were taken by Atkins in 1948 for a story about Marriott entitled “Good Mormons Don’t Go Broke” (Saturday Evening Post, June 10, 1950 pp. 48-49). The images may be found in SC&A‘s Oliver F Atkins Photograph Collection.

Wait staff-to-be receive tranining on proper placement of dining table items

Wait staff-to-be receive training on proper placement of dining table items. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS

while Marriott himself checks the cleanliness of the glassware.

while Marriott himself checks the cleanliness of the glassware. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS

Here, a gardener tidys up the front of a Hot Shoppes. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS

 

Here, a group of young ladies pose for Atkins' camera while enjoying a Hot Shoppes beverage

Here, a group of youngsters pose for Atkins’ camera while enjoying a Hot Shoppes beverage. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS

and two more patrons take advantage of the drive-in lane

and two more patrons take advantage of the drive-in lane. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS

SC&A Produces Film on James Buchanan

 

Buchanan accepts Nobel Prize, Stockholm 1986

Buchanan accepts the Nobel Prize, Stockholm 1986

 

Last fall the staff of SC&A had the opportunity to produce a short film about economist James Buchanan for the annual lecture series bearing his name. The film is titled Daring to Be Different: Reflections on the Life and Work of James Buchanan and runs about eight minutes. It was made with cooperation from The Center for Study of Public Choice and the Buchanan House. 

Set against an original score, the film features photographs, video images and interview clips, and attempts a concise retelling of Buchanan’s life and major achievements. SC&A staff collected oral history interviews from notable economists such as Donald Beaudreaux, Peter Boettke and Thomas Borcherding. The film is now available for viewing on the Mason Archival Repository Service (MARS) website: 

http://mars.gmu.edu/dspace/handle/1920/3408

James Buchanan was awarded the Alfred Nobel Prize in Economic Science in 1986 for his work in Public Choice Theory. Public Choice is an analytical method that uses the tools of economics to address issues of importance to the field of political science. As a comprehensive model it allows for an examination of polticians’ self-interests and the non-economic forces that drive political decision-making and the implementation of policy.

However, as we discovered in our research, Buchanan’s achievements extend well beyond his work in Public Choice; his is the quintessential boot-straps story. He came from very humble beginnings on a farm in Murfreesboro, Tennessee where he lived through The Great Depression. His mother nurtured his natural curiosity and proclivity for hard work and instilled the values that have come to shape his academic character. 

Before coming to George Mason University in 1983 Buchanan taught at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, the University of Virginia, Florida State University and the University of Tennessee.

Leonard H. Clark Collection

Special Collections and Archives staff recently completed the processing of the Leonard H. Clark collection.  The collection largely consists of documents, photographs, and memorabilia from Clark’s time in the United States Air Force during World War II.

Clark Collection, Kamikaze Sash, 1940s

Clark Collection, Kamikaze Sash, 1940s

Ollie Atkins Collection: India 1962

The majority of requests for our Ollie Atkins Collection are for his photographs of presidential politics, covered both as a photojournalist for the Saturday Evening Post, and later as the chief White House photographer during the Nixon administration. There is a lot more to his work, however, than just his coverage of Washington, and I am hoping to use this blog as a way to give exposure to some of his lesser seen images. To kick things off, I am starting with photographs of his trip to India in 1962.

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Close-up. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS

Atkins went to India in December of 1962 with Robert Sherrod, editor of the Saturday Evening Post, for an interview with Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru. The feature focused primarily on India’s conflicts with China and Pakistan, and their need for a modernized military. Atkins shot numerous rolls of film in New Delhi and Calcutta, covering military exercises as well as street scenes. The photographs used here were not used in the actual feature (with one exception).

A woman getting rifle training at Lady Shri Ram College

A woman getting rifle training at Lady Shri Ram College. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS

Fish market

Fish market. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS

Close-up of men recruited for the military

Close-up of men recruited for the military. Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection. Photo © SEPS

More photographs to come in part 2