Civil Rights in the James H. Laue Papers

James H. Laue was born in River Falls, Wisconsin, in 1937. In 1959, Laue was admitted to the Harvard graduate program in sociology where he studied race relations and the sociology of religion. During his graduate studies, Laue became involved in the Civil Rights movement, attending lunch counter sit-ins, church “kneel-ins,” and protests organized by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, giving him first-hand knowledge that he would go on to use in his 1966 doctoral dissertation, “Direct Action and Desegregation: Toward a Theory of the Rationalization of Protest.”

Civil Rights Notebook-Atlanta Sit-In, page 19. James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 53, Folder 02, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

Civil Rights Notebook-Atlanta Sit-In, page 19. James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 53, Folder 02, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Click image to enlarge.

 

In 1986, Laue came to George Mason University and became the first Lynch Professor of Conflict Resolution. Until his death in 1993, Laue participated in dozens of academic conferences, taught numerous classes and workshops on dispute resolution, published scores of academic papers, collaborated with Civil Rights activists and arms-control advocacy groups, delivered sermons at churches and speeches at graduate commencements, and remained active in the field of peacemaking and conflict resolution.

 

"Mission Statement". James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 5, Folder 02, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

“Mission Statement”. James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 5, Folder 02, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Click image to enlarge.

 

Poster for GMU Event. James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 98, Folder 14, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

Poster for GMU Event. James H. Laue papers, Collection #C0055, Box 98, Folder 14, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries. Click image to enlarge.

 

His papers contain manuscripts, workshop papers, notebooks, legal documents, photographs, audio cassettes, memorabilia and correspondence with influential figures like Coretta Scott King. These papers document Laue’s development as a sociology student and Civil Rights activist in the early 1960s through his career as a mediator and professor of urban sociology and conflict resolution into the early 1990s.

The James H. Laue papers can be searched by clicking on any of the links above. If you are interested in learning more about the School of Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University, click here.

To search the collections held at Special Collections Research Center, go to our website and browse the finding aids by subject or title. You may also e-mail us at speccoll@gmu.edu or call 703-993-2220 if you would like to schedule an appointment, request materials, or if you have questions. Appointments are not necessary to request and view collections.

Atkins finding aid available for Subject Print Subseries

The first subseries of the revised Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection is now available. The subjects cover life in Washington, D.C. (particularly John F. Kennedy and family in the late 1950s and early 1960s), American social and political issues, countries in Africa, the Korean War, and even our very own George Mason University. We hope to add the rest of the print series to the finding aid very soon. Currently, the processing work has shifted to the vast amount of negatives in the collection, many of which were used to create the prints. So think of the print series as merely a sample of the tens of thousands of images contained in the negatives.

View of Trinity Church in New York City taken from an adjacent building (August 1952) Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection, C0036, Box 3, Folder 13. ©SEPS

Oliver Atkins (left) and Norman Rockwell (1960s) Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection, C0036 Box 1 Folder 13. ©SEPS

A worker looks out across the Fria Company International for the Production of Aluminum facility in Guinea (November 1960) Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection, C0036 Box 4 Folder 1. ©SEPS

Guests arrive at the Statler Hotel in Washington, D.C. (May 1950) Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection, C0036 Box 4 Folder 6. ©SEPS

Chief Miyamoto, head of Ainu clan at Chiraoi, Hokkaido, Japan (August 1951) Oliver F. Atkins Photograph Collection, C0036 Box 1 Folder 5. ©SEPS

This collection is being reprocessed with funds provided by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

The Results Are In

Our researchers often give us valuable insights into our collections and point out hidden gems. Just recently, Ross Landis, a City of Fairfax historian who also volunteers at the City of Fairfax Regional Library’s Virginia Room, found such a gem in the Stacy Sherwood Collection. Stacy C. Sherwood grew up in Fairfax, Virginia and graduated from Fairfax High School in 1940. Sherwood spent much of his career working for the National Bank of Fairfax. Following in his father Albert Sherwood’s footsteps, who served as Fairfax Town Councilman for forty years, Stacy Sherwood served on the Town Council from 1956-1960 and Fairfax City Council from 1960-1964. Most of the materials in the collection date from his tenure as Fairfax Town and City Councilman. Below are two tally sheets from the collection that were used to count the votes in the mayoral and town council elections of 1960.

The votes are in and Fairfax has new Town Councilmen! There were six seats on the town council, so the six top candidates with the most votes won those seats.

John C. Wood was running unopposed for mayor. He got 233 votes and there was one write-in vote for Russell McLaughlin.

Some interesting facts about the City of Fairfax courtesy of Ross Landis:

  • The City of Fairfax was still the Town of Fairfax in 1960. City status wasn’t achieved until late June, 1961.
  • Albert Sherwood still holds the record as the longest serving member of the council. Albert served from 1916-1956.
  • Edgar A. Prichard (his name is spelled wrong on the tally sheets) went on to serve as mayor from 1964-1968. He defeated John C. Wood in a heated race.
  • George Hamill went on to serve as mayor from 1968-1970.
  • Dr. Fred Everly ran Everly’s Pharmacy, a local drug store and soda fountain.

Pictured here: Stacy Sherwood (far left), Roland Clarke (3rd from the left), John C. Wood (center behind Clarke), George Hamill (2nd from right) and Fred Everly (far right).

On Exhibit: The 1960s

The 1960s is regarded as one of the most turbulent times in recent history. SC&A has a new exhibit that highlights elements of the dramatic changes that took place during this decade using materials from the collections. The exhibit is divided into three parts: Popular Literature, American Life, and Politics and the Cold War. There is a physical exhibit located outside the department in Fenwick Library in addition to the online version we created using Omeka software. The primary collections featured in the exhibit include: The Francis McNamara Papers, the Rare Book Collection, American Public Transportation Association (APTA) Records, the James McDonnell Transportation Collection, and the Oliver Atkins Photograph Collection.

The online exhibit can be found here: http://bit.ly/9xwTvL