Document from scrapbook 14 of the Arthur E. Scott Photography Collection #C0096, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.
Document from scrapbook 14 of the Arthur E. Scott Photography Collection #C0096, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

On August 6, 1945, the United States of America dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city, Hiroshima. A few days later on August 9th, another bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. It has been estimated that the total casualties from both bombs was under 230,000 individuals.

 

Japan was fighting for control over land in the Pacific before World War II, leading Japanese naval and air forces to strike Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. This surprise attack left an estimated 3,500 American casualties, less than 100 of them civilians, and many sunken or damaged ships. There were significantly fewer Japanese casualties and the attack overall was a failure. For the next couple years, the United States of America began creating an atomic bomb to use during World War II since it was known that other countries were also experimenting with the creation of a nuclear weapon.

 

Document from scrapbook 14 of the Arthur E. Scott Photography Collection #C0096, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.
Document from scrapbook 14 of the Arthur E. Scott Photography Collection #C0096, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries.

 

The attack on Pearl Harbor was the beginning of the war between Japan and the United States. The U.S. government officially declared war with Japan on December 8, 1941. Only days later did the United States add Germany and Italy in their declaration of war, entering into World War II. As the war waged on, the United States of America, wanting Japan to surrender and end the war, dropped two atomic bombs. Shortly after the bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan surrendered and the war was over.

 

Canning, John, 50 True Tales of Terror, PR1309 .H6 A13 1972, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.
Canning, John, 50 True Tales of Terror, PR1309 .H6 A13 1972, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University.

 

“Hiroshima — Death and Rebirth” by C.E. Maine in 50 True Tales of Terror, is a story of a young man named Yoshio who experiences the devastation brought on by the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. The narrator describes the “blinding white flash” and “searing heat” that Yoshio will always remember. The rest of the tale follows Yoshio as he stumbles over rubble, finds his cousin badly injured, desperately searches for his family, and helps the local hospitals by finding medical supplies.

 

 

 

 

 

For more information:

Hiroshima Day

Hiroshima and Nagasaki Testimonies

Pearl Harbor Survivors

 

To search the collections held at Special Collections Research Center, go to our website and browse the finding aids by subject or title. You may also e-mail us at speccoll@gmu.edu or call 703-993-2220 to schedule an appointment or request materials.

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